Tokyo University of the Arts International Exchange Centre

Efforts are spearheaded by Canada Wood Japan to integrate NLT (nail-laminated timber) technology into the International Exchange Centre building at the Tokyo University of the Arts, a pioneering NLT demonstration project in Japan where the timber panels are utilized on the levels from 3rd to 5th. Located in the heart of the Ueno Campus of […]

Location

Tokyo to, Chiyoda ku, Itabashi 3-11-18, Itabashi MK Building

Size

Total floor area: 1494.47 ㎡ | NLT/Steel Hybrid Portion of floor area:345.51㎡

Developer

Tokyo University of the Arts

Architects

Maeda Construction Co., Ltd

Efforts are spearheaded by Canada Wood Japan to integrate NLT (nail-laminated timber) technology into the International Exchange Centre building at the Tokyo University of the Arts, a pioneering NLT demonstration project in Japan where the timber panels are utilized on the levels from 3rd to 5th.

Located in the heart of the Ueno Campus of Tokyo University of the Arts, the project is made possible thanks to the joint effort by the Council of Forestry IndustriesJapan 2×4 Home Builders Association in obtaining MLIT quasi-fireproof NLT floor assembly approvals in 2020. Supported by the generous funding from the Alberta government, the project is meant to showcase the potential of NLT use in improving both building sustainability, cost-effectiveness and overall design compatibility in hybrid steel and wood frame structures.

Nailed-laminated timber, also called nail-lam, is manufactured from planks of dimensional lumber, in most cases SPF, that are placed on their side and nailed to each other to form panels. One of the key appeals of NLT for the Japanese construction market is its economic viability. NLT can be an attractive alternative to CLT (cross-laminated timber) thanks to its ease of fabrication and installation that yield cost savings in materials and on site labour.

The easier and faster fabrication process, which does not require a dedicated manufacturing facility is another chief advantage. In this project, the panels were prefabricated in a nearby factory and efficiently flat-packed to the construction site, where they were erected in just 6 weeks.

Once completed, a case study video report will be prepared to share with the broader construction industry which will cover topics such as the construction advantages of NLT, the effectiveness of sound and fire performance and recommendations on installations. Japan’s building industry will benefit from lessons learned and key findings that can help drive wider NLT adoption in Japan’s fast-growing mass timber industry. 

The Canada Wood team has been working with Maeda Construction since 2019 to realize this first large-scale application of NLT construction in Japan. The project is scheduled to complete in October 2022.

The project is made possible through fundings from the Government of Alberta